In the Golden Indian Summer Days —- Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Before the huge storm blows in tonight or tomorrow, or whenever it happens to hit

(The weather people are clanging the warning bell, even as I write this)

(The alfalfa is frozen, but still showing color)

I thought I would show you the last flickering lights of our Indian Summer paradise—a wee piece of afternoon warmth before the temperatures plunging into December levels and pale wintery sunlight

We are very dry again. Although the shadows on the road are lovely.

The unharvested corn has gone from golden to pale yellow

I saw a possible Sundog, as Mindy and Boomer and I were taking a wee walkabout.

Storm coming in they say….maybe so, only time will tell. (As my Momma used to say)

Until then it is a beautiful Indian Summer.

From my world to your heart,

Linda

 

 

15 thoughts on “In the Golden Indian Summer Days —- Tuesday, November 19, 2019

  1. Beautiful photos! Yes, the storm is sapose to start here by tonight. Hope it’s not much of one. Curious, is the moisture content of the corn too high to harvest?

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  2. Late-19th century Boston lexicographer Albert Matthews made an exhaustive search of early American literature in an attempt to discover who coined the expression.[2] The earliest reference he found dated from 1851. He also found the phrase in a letter written in England in 1778, but discounted that as a coincidental use of the phrase.

    Later research showed that the earliest known reference to Indian summer in its current sense occurs in an essay written in the United States in the late 1770s (probably 1778) by J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur. The letter was first published in French. The essay remained unavailable in the United States until the 1920s.[3]

    Although the exact origins of the term are uncertain,[4] it was perhaps so-called because it was first noted in regions inhabited by Native Americans (“Indians”), or because the Native Americans first described it to Europeans,[5] or it had been based on the warm and hazy conditions in autumn when Native Americans hunted.[4] In addition to such conjectures, a great depth of Native American folklore is attributed to describing this phenomenon.

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