All in a Day’s Work —- Wednesday, August, 9, 2017

The pinto beans are setting on and starting to fill out —harvest will be sometime in September

Since we leave all our windows open day and night, the house smells like fresh mown hay.  Third cutting…  time is passing quickly now

While Terry mowed the hay I mowed my lawn…it was in dire need of my attention! 🙂

Yesterday we hauled in gravel and spread it on the long, long lane from the farmyard to the road….also putting down gravel in the farm yard itself

Then the thing I hate to do worse than anything….is getting Terry out of a tight spot.

He went over to make a ditch, got stuck…I had to come over and pull him out…

When he is in a ditch like this I’m always afraid I will pull him ‘wrong’ and cause the tractor to tip over.

When I was young our neighbor did tip over and it killed him.   Then (when our kids were grown) Terry’s good friend was working on one of his ditches when his tractor tipped over and killed him.

Scary stuff…working on wet ditches!

Finally we made it to the end of the day…the water changed for the last time until first light.

 

It was time to watch a little TV, rest a spell before bed. to relax.

Boomer lay down beside my chair, while I worked on a needlepoint canvas.

The day finally …. finally coming to an end.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

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Spring Work is Winding Down—Thursday, June 23, 2016

The header is the photo of the flat lands, our cows LOVED being up there and just hanging out. We like to go to the Rocky Point and ‘take a break’, there is something really restful about this part of the farm.

We call spring work—everything that must be done until the tractor can’t get in there anymore.  After that we just irrigate, until harvest time.

Summer work is irrigation

Fall is harvest, although, the corn harvest the last couple have years has been way into winter.  Still we consider it fall, until the corn is in.

Last-Cultivation-this-fieldThis is the last cultivation of this field—I call it the Middle Field, Terry calls it by it’s acres.

Cultivation has to stop when the corn is as tall as the bottom of the tractor’s little wheels, to try to run the tractor down after that will result in killing the growing corn.

No more tractor work on this field.  The next time something big is on this field will be the combine at harvest time.

Cultivating-Corn

This field has a little more growing to go, then it will be done.

BeansThe pinto beans are looking GOOD!  There is still tractor work–cultivation–on these little guys, but it will stop once the plants are bushy.  With this heat it won’t that long.

Work-1

Our alfalfa hay is getting up to eight leaves.  (I forgot to take a photo of it)

StuckThen, of course, there are always those things that tend to slow ya down… (The tractor making the ditch slipped off and got stuck.

OUTIt didn’t take long to get him out.  Just a little slow down.

UnstuckThen back to the house I go!

Your friend on a farm in western Colorado 🙂

Linda

Stuck Tractor

This is exactly the kind of stuff I hate…pulling out a stuck tractor—and it’s treating to rain … again.

So Terry takes one tractor and I drive the other tractor and off we go to get the one Terry stuck

But it is even WORSE than I thought because the tractor is on the edge of a ravine.  The ravine isn’t large, but it is steep and covered in slick, matted, winter-killed grass. 

No! I do not back up tractors that are in dangerous positions!!!!  I should, I know.  But I am not that good of a driver and rolling a tire on the edge (the very edge) of a ravine is way above my skills.

This whole thing is just terrifying to me-when I was in high school our neighbor had his tractor tip over backward and kill him, my Dad had a tractor roll on top of him and crush his pelvis, and one of Terry’s very best friends had a tractor roll backward and kill him.  I HATE STUFF LIKE THIS!!!!!

Finally OUT! Whew! 

Linda