A Chill Autumn Day—Tuesday, September 22, 2017

It’s been raining again…all through the night Sunday and most of the day Monday. It’s cold enough we had to start up the wood stove; sure felt nice!

We still have one more field of pinto beans to get out…but it must dry first!

The weather people are saying the sunshine is due to come back today…warmer weather tomorrow, then by Thursday we will experience NICE fall weather.

Maybe by then we will be able to get the ‘rest of the beans’ out!  🙂

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

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With a Great, Deep Breath—-Monday, September 11, 2017

It’s constant now…that checking of the crops… are they made?  Is it time?

We can’t take the water off too soon or the little seeds will not be at premium fullness.

As for the pinto beans….

In the wee early pause, between shadow and sunlight. as the sky paled toward sunrise

While the dew filled the plants, making them pliable and soft Terry headed out to begin the harvest of the pinto beans.

Then, when the sun filled the air, and the western stars started to fade…I went out to take photos.

 

Terry will work until the dew starts to dry up…then he will stop and start again the next pre-dawn day.

I’t important to pull the plants up from the ground, while they are cold and damp, so the pods do NOT shatter and spill the beans all over the soil.

Then we wait.  A week, maybe more.  All the time continually checking. Making sure the timing is right…. soon.  Very soon…we will be hauling pinto beans to market!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

All in a Day’s Work —- Wednesday, August, 9, 2017

The pinto beans are setting on and starting to fill out —harvest will be sometime in September

Since we leave all our windows open day and night, the house smells like fresh mown hay.  Third cutting…  time is passing quickly now

While Terry mowed the hay I mowed my lawn…it was in dire need of my attention! 🙂

Yesterday we hauled in gravel and spread it on the long, long lane from the farmyard to the road….also putting down gravel in the farm yard itself

Then the thing I hate to do worse than anything….is getting Terry out of a tight spot.

He went over to make a ditch, got stuck…I had to come over and pull him out…

When he is in a ditch like this I’m always afraid I will pull him ‘wrong’ and cause the tractor to tip over.

When I was young our neighbor did tip over and it killed him.   Then (when our kids were grown) Terry’s good friend was working on one of his ditches when his tractor tipped over and killed him.

Scary stuff…working on wet ditches!

Finally we made it to the end of the day…the water changed for the last time until first light.

 

It was time to watch a little TV, rest a spell before bed. to relax.

Boomer lay down beside my chair, while I worked on a needlepoint canvas.

The day finally …. finally coming to an end.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Crop Report—-Tuesday, July 25, 2017

This year’s pinto bean field..almost weeded!  Almost!

I don’t have much time left…the feelers are starting to grow shut!

That’s okay…I’m tired of weeding that huge field.

The ears are starting to form now…within each one is a tiny kernel of corn!

 

Summer…MY TIME!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm

Linda

The Jewels of Summer—Sunday, July 23, 2017

The corn is starting to tassel out…

And baby ears of corn starting to form

The pinto beans are shooting feelers (last year’s photo–I lost this years somehow—I’ve been weeding the 16 acres early morning and late evening.  Once the rows grow shut anything nasty growing out there—corn, cockleburs, ragweed, Pigweed, yellow sticker weed, scotch thistle….gets to grow.  Not a good thing, but how it is.

My yard is doing

Great!  The new railroad ties beds are softening up and looking ever so much better

The air smells lush and rich– full of sweetness

Summer — I can’t ask for anything more!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

High Summer—-Sunday, July 16, 2017

It is high summer the sky is a clear blue, the heat is elevated, afternoon thunder storms roll in cooling us down;  the humidity causing us pant in desperation

Yet the summer has been good…all the hay is sold; first and second cuttings.

Blade helped…nice for him and for us!

The corn is starting to tassel out!

The pinto beans are growing right along…

The last cultivation of all crops is over for the rest of the year! 🙂

High Summer…the best part of the year.

Come winter I will be assailed by memories

Of these innocent heat filled days.

Come winter…

….I won’t think of that bleak time ahead. Instead I will enjoy this spot in time.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

The Feeling of a Mountain—Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Today I am counting my blessings:

The first cutting of hay has been cut, dried, baled and stacked.

(And at the time of this writing, several loads of have been sold–loaded up and gone to new homes)

The biggest blessing is the fact Terry had to have an emergency appendix operation Sunday morning—shortly before noon, but is doing much better today.

Thankfully Saturday night we had turned the water back into the canal so I haven’t had to worry with changing and setting of the water.

Our children, near and far, came to see their Dad and to help us while Terry was in the hospital— it made the loading of the sold hay go ever so much easier, than if I had to do it by myself.

They have all gone home now, but the several days Terry was in the hospital I was there with him.  That left the kids to pick up our slack plus do their own work also.

What a huge relief!

In the midst of all this, I found another small heart!

It might be a mountain right now, but I know —————   somehow we will get the cultivation of the corn done and we will get the pinto beans planted.

I can do the irrigation…that isn’t even an concern.

The others things will sort themselves out as we proceed forward.

 

It will just take us (Terry and I) to take it one step at a time…that is really the only way to walk up, across and down and mountain.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

Step Three/Pinto Bean Harvest—September 12, 2016

pinto-bean-head-for-the-com

The pinto beans are harvested with a pinto bean combine and pinto bean header.
picking-up-the-beansThis is how it works, gently lifting up the rows and moving them through the combine, where it breaks out the pinto beans and put them in the hopper

bean-strawThe trash—everything that is NOT a pinto bean is thrashed and left behind.  Now if you have cockaburs, sunflower seeds, or Canada Thistle seeds they will also be combined and flung into the hopper with the pinto beans.

pintos-in-the-truck

Once there they all go into the truck and hauled to the Beanery, where we are docked for trash in the beans.  Therefore, now you know why we always hand weed our fields–the cleaner the beans the more money we bring home.  (You can see some of the ‘trash’ [in the back of our truck] which wasn’t cleaned out in with the pinto beans…this is also trash, which will dock us.)

The other problem, with those seeds, is when the pinto beans go over the shaker at the Beanery, they are the same size as a pinto bean and shake right with the beans.  If you have too many and have to have the pinto beans triple cleaned….well you get the picture.

storm-coming-in-2A storm is coming in…I hope it stays far way.  If it rains we will have a mess with the pinto bean harvest in the field that is pulled.  😦

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

Pinto Bean Harvest— Step One—-Thursday, September 8, 2016

time-to-pull-beans

The pinto beans are ready for harvest.  The leaves have dried and fallen off leaving only the pods.

the-730Early, early Terry headed out to put the bean puller on the tractor and get into the field.

bean-pullerIt was cool enough he had to put on a jacket.  It’s important to go early…long before the sun heats up the earth like an old-fashioned flatiron.

The pinto bean plants need to be cold,so when the tractor goes through the pods stay on the vines, and the pinto beans stay in the shell.

front-and-backThe process is in steps–first the pinto beans are pulled

pulling-beans-1Laying the beans in neat rows to dry.

pulled-beansThen the bright morning warmed up, gilding everything.  It was time to stop.

One field down, one more to go.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

The Last of Summer’s Hay—-Thursday, September 1 , 2016

Turning-the-haySunday we ‘did’ hay.

Because we had lots of rain and hail before we could get the hay up; Terry had to ‘turn’ the hay.  Sunday Morning he raked the hay turning it over so the top will be the bottom, and the bottom will be the top and the top will dry.

Baling-with-a-swallowThen about 1:00 in the afternoon the alfalfa had turned to hay. Off Terry went to bale.

Rolling-Bales-2

And Boomer and went out to roll bales and pick up broken bales (there were only two) and pick up all the loose hay on the corners

Rolling-Bales-1

Then we started hauling in the bales.

Stacking-Hay

(See the twisted bales?)

I did have a sort of a fright…not bad, but I was very much startled.  A huge bull snake was resting under one of the bales, when I moved the bale he jumped up and slithered off and I jumped up and out of his path!  🙂 🙂

We got half the field up and then finished on Monday; after we finished we worked some more on the firewood.

We are still irrigating, the alfalfa field will be the last field we set water on then we will be done for the year.  BUT FIRST…the field has to be marked out so the water can get down the rows.  Seems like there is always something.

Now-It's-Fall

It’s cold enough we must wear jackets in the early morning and late evening when we set water.  Sure seems early for jackets, but it is what it is.

Next will be pinto bean harvest—soon…very soon.

(Terry and I are getting a tad tired right now.)

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda