Crops and Where We Are Now — Thursday, September 16, 2021

The corn is drying now…past all its growing time getting ready for harvest

Each field (we have three) shows the maturity of the corn –the shucks drying down,

The tops turning gold, then gradually turning brown.

The kernels are dented

and hard enough you can’t poke a hole in them.

The last set of water has been accomplished and then turned off of all the cornfields.

Although, we are still irrigating the three alfalfa fields.

But, for the corn, the growing season has finished.  Now we wait for it to dry down to the correct dryness, at which time we start corn harvest.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

 

We Made It to Third Cutting — Wednesday, September 8, 2021

The smoke is back, seeping into everything (again)

We have made it to the third cutting of alfalfa…both fields are cut and drying now

It will take longer to dry since the nights tingle with Autumn cool

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

That Time of the Year (Again) — Sunday, May 30, 2021

Yep,

Off he went,

Right after the water was set in the morning

Two days in a row

One field down…two to go!

HAYING SEASON HAS BEGUN!

🙂 🙂 🙂

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

What We Have Been Doing, (all in caps :) ), Wednesday, April 14, 2021

We have two fields of alfalfa being irrigated now…one is almost done (tonight) the other one tomorrow night.

Terry has finished leveling one cornfield, and marked it out, then packed the rows

After which, we started water on it last night.  This will take several days to have this field wet, but we have begun.  After the whole field is wet then it will set for a spell to dry out some. Then we plant.

Of course, there are other fields of corn to go through the

leveling, marking, irrigation, plant process

And another hayfield.  But we are making progress.

 

Besides helping Terry set tubes, I have been working in my yard.  Two days worth of work and three more to go

And I can say—Spring has arrived in my yard!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Gloriously Hot —Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Perfect for making hay!

Rain, rain, stay away.  Come again some other day!

🙂

The third (3rd) cutting of the first field!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Well-Come Summer Days and Summer Work —- Thursday, July 2, 2020

Here we are, the start of July — a time to me as a time of pleasure-

Next week will be the second cutting of the First field of alfalfa—the air will be full of that indescribable sweetness of green

We’ve been cutting brush…a tiny victory which has no truce—seems there are always ‘brush’ to trim 🙂

 

The corn is growing and growing—

Terry is standing on top of the ditch bank the cornfield is lower than the farm road

Summer is such a favorite time of the  year, for me

Time of heat, color, and joyful little birds

Moving on through the farm

The pastures are looking good, rich, green, lush

No way can I stand on the ditch like Terry…I would fall in!

Summer, when the sun starts moving back toward winter

But, everything else, myself included

Continues to dream-walk through the warmth, the heat, and the beauty of Summer

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

 

A Sparkle which Really is Brilliance— Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Terry is checking the moisture in the furrows—we want the water to sub over under the top of the soil, deep inside of the furrow

You can see the top of the soil showing wet

It seems simple, doesn’t it?  And in theory, it is; in practice, it takes lots of monitoring and paying close attention

Sometimes you can walk out on a dry looking row and suddenly sink right up to your ankles…sigh.

The water running beneath the dam is good…this is the water going to the next field — if the water was coming over the top of the dam we would need to start more tubes

The brilliant rays of sunlight on the furrows, in one of the alfalfa fields

It was so pretty, the glow of the rays, the sparkle of the water, the rich green of the alfalfa plants coming together in a perfect way.

Then when I looked up, in the bluest of blue skies, a sweet little bird flew over-head

The work is hard, still nothing to hide from,

I truly could not ask for more.

From my world to your heart,

Linda

 

 

Frost Early This Year — Monday, November 4, 2019

(from Pinterest)

The remnants of Summer freeze-dried right on the trees, with that nasty storm last week. (As you can see the bright gold of Autumn barely started)

The moisture in the corn zipped down to harvest levels.  Although our renters have not started harvesting on our place

The alfalfa fields are just starting to show signs of turning brown…it takes alfalfa a long time to lose its green color.

Moon and one star

The chill of winter already upon the land.  Methinks we are in for a long, long winter.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

A World which is New —- Wednesday, October 16, 2019

The heavy freezes are continuing.

The alfalfa is always slower to react than, say corn, or the leaves on trees.

Gradually, over a long series of heavy freezes, the fields will turn brown, all the juices stored in the roots, slumbering until spring.

Creating a new world, ready for winter long nap.

And now, for a tiny bit of summer life

Yesterday, I captured, on camera, a butterfly/moth exploding into the air as Boomer and I walked by.

I’m finding capturing bugs in flight is very hard to do. (But ever so fun, when I actually get one on camera.)

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Sounds Echo —- Monday, May 21, 2018

The sound of the tractor adds to the un-silence of the land.

Terry planted the pinto beans five days ago, and today he is Mormon Creasing the field.  By that he is taking taking the top off the row and smoothing out the top of the row so the little plants can work their way through a smaller amount of soil.

He also planted a new alfalfa field, which will make us two fields of alfalfa.  Although, the new field won’t be ready until next year.  There will be a possible cutting in September, but sometimes he doesn’t cut it; allowing the cows to graze it off instead.

This makes the whole farm in production. Finally.  Everything is some form of growth or another.

The irrigation water sparkles and splashing it’s way down each furrow cool and free.

Tomorrow or Wednesday (depending on the weather) it will be time to cut the alfalfa

next to our house.  Then the air will be scented with green alfalfa drying into lovely hay.

I will leave all the windows open in the house so the perfume fills our rooms and scents our sleep.

Busy times,

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda