Finally, Sunday, July 26, 2020

In between rainstorms and hissing wind

The second cutting of the second alfalfa field

Is stacked and heading to other homes

It can rain all it wants to now. And the rain will be greatly appreciated.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Sherlock Boomer—-What Mom Doesn’t Know, Chapter Six, Friday, July 24, 2020

Chapter Six

While Mom and Dad were out in the second hayfield

trying to beat the

rainstorm heading our way—

I decided

to let myself out of the house

 

When out of nowhere

LOKI showed up!

“Hey, Boomer! Let’s go do something!”

Oh, my goodness, I thought to myself, Loki-Ta-Moki—Mindy Cat better hide

“HIDE MINDY!” I bayed

As soon as I bayed Loki decided to go FIND Mindy….

Ears up, tail wagging…

paws in FAST MOTION…Loki took off right to Mindy’s favorite spot to hang out.

Whew…No Mindy.

“Hey, Lok!  Slow down.  Let’s check for news and see what has been happening around here.”

I put my nose to the ground and started sniffing—

“Squirrel, Loki, Mom’s squirrel she has been feeding, came through.”

‘O!  Lok—SKUNK!!! We’ve got to be careful.  Either one of us gets sprayed it’s sleeping in the shed tonight.”

Loki just bounced around, running here there and everywhere.

“Just give me the good stuff, Boomer, something that runs fast and will get away from me.  Ya know.  I don’t want to catch anything…I just want to CHASE! Like RUN FAST!

Humm, I muttered –“Oh, Loki!–-FOX!”

“FOX!?”  Loki stopped his prancing and dancing around. “WHERE? WHERE!”  Tell me, Boomer…POINT THE WAY!”

“Huh, I think he headed to the Upper End, Loki.”

“UPPER END! SEE YA, BOOMER!” 

Loki yelled as he sped around the junk pile

Geez, I wonder if I got that dog lost.  Man, will the little kids be upset!

 

Sigh.

Oh, well…time for a nap.

**************************************************************************************************

 

Later that day…

just around evening I heard lots of chatter and the patter of feet.

Out the door, I went.

There was Kya, Black Dog, and LOKI!

Loki said he had a blast at the Upper End.  He didn’t see the fox or anything really…he just ran and ran and ran.

I led the way to the Back Door,

Where we all milled around until  Mom came out with treats for ALL OF US!!

YAY!

Then Mom and I walked with my sister, all the dogs, and my little human niece, Tally, half-way back to the other side of the farm, where they were staying for the summer.

By the Gift of Friendship—-Sunday, March 25, 2018

This month (March 18th to be exact) I have been blogging eleven years.

I have shared our simple, busy, farm life with you. I have shared my excitement over the fresh green shoots of new grass growing, or the tiny little plants of corn or pinto beans, today I’m showing you the sprouts of alfalfa just starting to arrive in the alfalfa field.

For eleven years you have watch the soul of each and every season—the opening of the land, the growing season, harvest…and the rest– called winter.

You have been with Terry and I as we built and repaired fences, or as in yesterday—took one clear out so we could have a larger field.

You’ve been with me through the joys and wonders of the wild life upon our farm—the last of the Sand Hill Cranes left our farm yesterday—lifting up into the sky with thrilling calls telling us THANK You….we will come again.  And I stood there and called back to them….PLEASE DO! You are always welcome.

Coming back into the yard I saw three Robins….Spring is truly here for sure!

You’ve shared night-time walks with me (this is the moon right now…2:00 a.m)

And that amazing sky we live under.

Thank you each and everyone so much for coming along with me, for leaving me your comments so I can get to know you also, and for being readers, even if you don’t leave comments.

Thank you for making my eleven years of blogging so very rewarding.

From my heart to your world,

Linda

I Work in my Delight—Wednesday, July 29, 2015

BalesAs far as the camera can see

Cornerwashed in sunlight and heat

InIt takes 45 minutes to get a full load

DBut I …have the best part

My-helpI have help!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

Catch a Falling Star — Thursday, July 23, 2015

HayAfter Terry cut the alfalfa and I stopped painting for the day–meaning after supper, we went out and worked in the pinto bean field.PB1WE FINISHED!!!  The pinto beans are free and clear (for a spell)

feelers.jpgThere will be weeds appearing again, but for Terry and I— we are done.  The pinto beans are starting to shoot the feelers.  These little vines will grab onto to each other and cause the rows to grow shut.

Beautiful The sun had set and we were heading back home, when I noticed something flashing and twinkling in the late evening sky.

FS

Drifting down, down, down we saw it land gently in the upper part of the pinto bean field.  Hopeing it would NOT get away I hurried to the upper end of the pinto bean field, to see a helium balloon shaped like a star resting among the pinto bean rows.

Falling-Star

A fun little gift from the heavens!

Star I nestled the star on the four-wheeler, laying a large rock on it’s string, tucked my weeding knife securing under the bars and brought the falling star home.

Your friend on a Western Colorado farm,

Linda

Summertime—July 13, 2015

Coming-inSummertime and the liv’n is not as easy as winter.  Tee Hee

DitchThis Terry coming in from making ditches…that’s the ditcher on the back.

I’ve been painting the outside of our house. It really needs it.  Last year I painted down at the other house, but this year I MUST focus on this place.

12Our corn is getting close to tasseling out!  What a joy that is–the too wet and cold spring, followed by smashing heat gave us a wonder if the corn was going to pull through.

hayHere Terry is staking a load of hay…I am in charge of getting the  stack stable…think poles and such holding up the stack…not a hard job, but a necessary job.  We are already getting hay customers, which is a very good thing.

fffff

Of course there is always water to change, several times a day.  If not change at least check.

I would really like to wash my windows, but we are being gifted with afternoon thunder and rain storms…I think I will wait a spell. 🙂

Me-going-outBoomer and I go out to scatter the corn once a day.  This is old corn we keep around to feed the deer, birds, raccoons, whatever or whoever wants some—it keeps the critters OUT of the corn fields.

Life is busy.  To be honest with you I really don’t want it any other way.

Off now to keep painting — I just about have one side done.  ( We have a two-story house…I sure dread the 2nd story 😦 )

I still need to do the eaves on the west side, which is going to be time consuming.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Racing Against Time—Wednesday, June 24, 2015

I am sorry about not being able to post yesterday…the internet was down.  Sure was frustrating!

Anyway, it’s back up today, for which I rejoice greatly!

Time-!We are racing madly here.  Everything came together all at once—the pinto beans needed watered, the corn needed fertilized and cultivated, and needs water —the hay needs hauled in from the last field, and the water sat on it.  (Not to mention weeding in my yard –two more huge beds to go—helping a tad down at the other house…clipping hedges and other yard work–ironing and straightening up my house, mundane things but necessary.)

Time-2The days are just not long enough 🙂  🙂

Although, we get up at 4:15 and then finish around 10 at night, there always seems to be something more needing done.

Time-4Don’t read bad into this              ——————          I LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF IT!!!

We hauled hay until too dark…Boomer and I picked up the loose bales and broken bales and Terry hauled in the loads.

time-3.jpgIt was miserable hot yesterday…my car said it was 111*f (43.89c) when I ran to buy groceries for the month.  That’s HOT!

Around 8:30 or 9:00 p.m. it looked like a hail or rain storm broke over Peach Valley.  It was just too hot not to develop some sort of activity in the heavens.

Today we are still in the same race…although, we are gaining on the pinto beans (the beans are up!  YAY!) with the water, the small corn field is wet, and cross all fingers, Terry will get the big corn field fertilized and cultivated today-then we start water on it tonight).

Two more days of hauling hay and that will be over.  Then, if it rains, all is well.

Although, we are busy; it’s a good busy!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

Socked in- Sunday, September 28, 2014

A HUGE rain storm rolled in last night complete with rolling thunder and stunning flashes of lightening.  By 9:00 in the evening we were wet.  The rain hasn’t let up since the storm rolled in.  On one hand the lovely drenching of all the parched and dried spots in the lawns and fields is a very good thing—on the other hand not so lovely.  It’s harvest here.  Not for us.  We have finished our harvest of the two first crops and are waiting for the corn to dry down before we start the third and last crop –corn.

Rain-1

There are others, neighbors and friends, who are in the middle of onion harvest, or their pinto bean harvest, or getting in the last cutting of alfalfa turned hay.

Moisture like this is not good for harvest.  😦

TSThis weekend found us in Craig, Colorado, to watch our grandson play Middle School football and take

FriendsEllie up to play with Linky for a spell.  Of course, we also got to enjoy the little Cowgirl and her REAL Cowgirl girl friends.

Tri-StateCraig is home to Tri-State Generation plant.  My Dad worked at the station right after it was built- until he retired.  Daddy started work for Colorado Ute—now Tri-State–at the Hayden plant, then was promoted to this plant right after it was built.

My parents moved to Hayden, Colorado, the year I was pregnant with Evan. They stayed they for over twenty years, Daddy retiring from Colorado Ute (Tri-State) and Momma retiring form Peabody Coal.

It’s sort of ironic that our youngest daughter and her family are now back in the Moffat/Routt County area don’t you agree?

Paonia-MountainsAnyway we are back to a decidedly very wet fall day.  It has the feel of a huge weather switch coming…I wonder if a killing frost will follow all this moisture; I would not be surprised.

It’s all most October…a killing frost is just around the corner, if not imminent.

Your friend on a farm,

Linda

 

Summer’s Gifts—Tuesday, September 2, 2014

It is cold here this morning.  49*…a light jacket was in order to change the irrigation water.

unnamed

As a gift to me   I was sent several photos of those beautiful little flying jewels of summer.  Kagedog lives in Cedaredge, Colorado and is a regular visitor to our little blog.  She knows how much I enjoy the Hummingbirds so sent to me some very nice photos.  She also gave me permission to share them with you. 🙂

unnamed (1)

I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

We still have lots of Hummingbirds here.  I don’t know if they are the regulars or if they are moving through.  This morning they were fluffed way up as they drank from the feeders.  Although, it is cool in the mornings the days still warm up nicely, as much as 89*.

unnamed (2)I hope your Tuesday is a good one.  It’s time to put the bean puller on and finish work on the combine.  We are still waiting for the alfalfa to turn into hay.  Hope the rains stay away for a least two or more weeks!

unnamed (3)

Your friend on a western Colorado Farm,

Linda

Stretch Marks, Labor Day, Monday, September 1, 2014

It’s that time of year….

Third-Cutting-of-Hay(Third cutting of alfalfa)

When all of spring and summer come together

Pink-over-hayThird cutting of hay is cut and drying…Terry is raking and turning the rows even as I type away.

SoonSoon, very soon…maybe tomorrow or the next day…it all depends on the weather, he will pull the pinto beans.

Stretches-4The corn has passed the blister stage, moving into the dough. After that it will be ready to ‘dry down’.

Stretch-2We are on the last little bits of irrigation.  No more changing water on the pinto beans, only one more good soaking of the alfalfa, after the last bale has been hauled and stacked (possibly two if the fall is terribly dry—alfalfa can’t go into the winter dry or the crop will die.)

All that is left is watering the corn, by the end of September (in 30 days, maybe a few more, but not many-maybe even less) the irrigation water will be turned off to our farm.

We will be done.

After that we wait…until the last of October or the first of November when the harvest of the field corn begins.  Those that have ensilage or chopp’n corn, or silage (it’s all one in the same) will start filling the silos this week.

The stretch for harvest has begun!

Sun-eveningThen winter’s silence will descend.

But not for awhile.

Not for awhile.

Not just yet.

The gift of the spring and summer’s work will be collected.  The work is has begun!

We will stretch ourselves thin, eat on the run, get up before dawn and settle back down way after dusk.  It will look easy to those driving by—people who have moved to the country to get away from the crowds.

I suppose it is, after all these years…it’s because we practice all the time. The continuing education credits come when this year’s paycheck comes in.  (We are paid once a year for pinto beans and corn.  The hay brings in small checks as the bales are sold.)

Stretch-1Harvest!  It is what we work for— the accumulation of the year.

Your friend on a farm in Western Colorado,

Linda