The Rhythm of Our Life—-Tuesday, April 18, 2017

The rhythm of our life

The Joy upon our faces and

the sunshine on the land

Morning, noon, and night.

This is the rhythm of our days
The rhythm of the land

The daily rhythm

Even in the way dark of the night

We spend it chasing water

 

This is the rhythm of our lives!

(Pretty bad, but I couldn’t get that song the Rhythm of the Night out of my head—tee hee)

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

The Last of Summer’s Hay—-Thursday, September 1 , 2016

Turning-the-haySunday we ‘did’ hay.

Because we had lots of rain and hail before we could get the hay up; Terry had to ‘turn’ the hay.  Sunday Morning he raked the hay turning it over so the top will be the bottom, and the bottom will be the top and the top will dry.

Baling-with-a-swallowThen about 1:00 in the afternoon the alfalfa had turned to hay. Off Terry went to bale.

Rolling-Bales-2

And Boomer and went out to roll bales and pick up broken bales (there were only two) and pick up all the loose hay on the corners

Rolling-Bales-1

Then we started hauling in the bales.

Stacking-Hay

(See the twisted bales?)

I did have a sort of a fright…not bad, but I was very much startled.  A huge bull snake was resting under one of the bales, when I moved the bale he jumped up and slithered off and I jumped up and out of his path!  🙂 🙂

We got half the field up and then finished on Monday; after we finished we worked some more on the firewood.

We are still irrigating, the alfalfa field will be the last field we set water on then we will be done for the year.  BUT FIRST…the field has to be marked out so the water can get down the rows.  Seems like there is always something.

Now-It's-Fall

It’s cold enough we must wear jackets in the early morning and late evening when we set water.  Sure seems early for jackets, but it is what it is.

Next will be pinto bean harvest—soon…very soon.

(Terry and I are getting a tad tired right now.)

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

The Adventures of Boomer on Friday—-Dad, Mom, Tally, and ME!

We have Tally here!  Tally and I hang out together and do FUN Tally and Boomer stuff!

All the time!

Helping-Grandpa-4

We also work.

Helping-Grandpa-3

We go with Dad and Mom and irrigate.

Helping-Grandpa-2

Mom and Dad change the water and Tally makes sure the water goes down the rows.

Helping-Grandpa1

I look for NEWS!

I LOVE news.

Helping-Grandpa-6

Tally is here until the weekend.  It’s her week with Dad, Mom and ME!

I LOVE having Tally here!

Boomer

When Time Stops—Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Evening-Gift-2On Sunday we left the Uncompahgre Plateau—25 Mesa to be exact—around three o’clock in the afternoon. Leaving behind the sun-warmed flowers, leaf mold, and coolness mountain air always seems to have.

Good-Morning-SunshineThe morning of Monday the sun broke free of the tree line; way after we got in from changing the water.  The air was full of wide awake birds, winging their way here and there.  Their flights crisscrossing the paths of other birds…no flight plan needed.

All-season-allAll, except for the pinto bean field,  the tractor work has ceased.  One more time a little later the pinto beans will be cultivated—knocking down the weeds so the beans can grow without interference.

Sun-over-the-PlateauWe work until the light slowly fades, retreating beyond the Uncompahgre Plateau.  The thick shadows, edge the the little knolls on our place, and rim the the ditch banks.  The fugitive light highlights the leaves on the corn causing green shadows, which shift in the evening breeze.

Shadows“This is my favorite time of the day,”  Terry tells me at least once a week.  “The air cools, a feeling of renewal takes place, everything starts to have a calm feeling.”

Morning-FlightFor me it is morning.

My favorite time of the day…for just a second, as the sky lightens, the hope of the new day rises in me, I feel energized and ready for whatever might come.”

SunriseIt is only for a moment.

Then the sun bursts froth and the day begins.  But for the moment it feels as if the freshness of the day will last forever.

Sunset-2

Either way—sunrise, or sunset…the feeling is there.  The moment when time stops.  I’m sure it is different for everyone.  That feeling of birth.

From my world to your heart,

Linda

Once Farming Begins—-Wednesday, June 8, 2016

CultivateNothing stops for very long. (Getting ready to cultivate)

OffThere is always something to do.  The work begins in that strange dawn light, called First Light.  That time when the light just starts to swell and become real.

Off-4

The work is solitary, but not lonely

Off-3There is always something (here he is going to knock down the dirt so the plants come push through)

Planting-PintosPlanting the last of our crops, the pinto beans.  The type we plant is Bill Zee.

Sitting-Water-on-the-dirt-d

And always, always there is the water to change…morning, noon and night….and sometimes at mid-night.

WaitingI do NO tractor work, but Boomer and I always help with the irrigation.

Wind

Wind, rain, sun, and in the shredding of the night, called Dawn

Ponder

or the slow leaving of the sun’ dominance of the day

Photo-of-Us

We are there.  Moving together as one.

From my world to your heart,

Linda

The Voice of the Wind—-Monday, April 25, 2016

Dams-1I can’t remember now, which day was so full of wind we had trouble setting the dams in the dirt ditch, maybe it was Thursday or Friday — when you don’t work for someone else each day tends to be the same as the day before and the day following.

More-DamsAnyway we had a big wind for along time.  It was cold at different points, warmer at other points.

Ditch-CompanyThe canals filled up with trash — enough that the ditch company had to come back through with their equipment to clean them out.

More-DCBoomer was deeply enchanted with having them come through

Stranger!The wind actually picked up his ears, for him, as he ran forward to ‘save the farm’  I was delighted at his cute ears flying in the wind!

Mid-night-water-checkWind of that magnitude (55 m.p.h. gusts) causes us to go out several times at night —keeping the canal in it’s banks, the irrigation water in the proper ditches and the furrows going straight.  Night-CheckAll without weeds and debris, to choke everything off and cause floods. Runs like this give us a sense of absolute security.

FlowingThen the wind leaves, pushing its way onto other parts of the country.  The setting sun lights up the water with jewels; the flat lands and canyons below our mesa shadowed in deep indigo and purple, the edges of the Uncompahgre rich in the color of rubies.

SetTerry and I share a deep contentment, of work well done, as we finish up in the company of the sky.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

Building Gates—Monday, March 28, 2016

Gate1Early, early Terry, Boomer, and I were at one of the cement ditches putting in new gates for the coming year.  The old ones were broken and/or crumbling so they needed replace.

Gate-2The shadows were long, ever so long, and the air brisk and chilly when we went out.

GateBy the time we finished the shadows had shorted to almost represent solar noon.

Still… we are done now.  Set for another year.

A good feeling.  Water should start around the second week or the third week of April.  (for us)

The water is already in the canals heading our way.  I guess I could say this another way…we will start water on our place the second or third week of April.

The ditches are now ready!  Which is a very good thing!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

The Land Calls—Monday, February 29, 2016

Oh! Jolly!  This the LAST DAY OF FEBRUARY!  YIPPEE!!

Combine-ready-to-goTerry and I have been working on the corn combine…little repairs here and there.  Yes, I help, invariably we come into the house with cuts and bruises, but it’s getting finished.  Ready for next years harvest.  As I write this he is putting in the last couple of bolts.

Truck

Saturday afternoon he started on repairing the heater in the grain truck. It’s very cold sitting down at the elevator withOUT a heater.

farming-starts.jpgWell, I think you have now guessed the answer to the million dollar question—Terry is going to farm.

“Are you sure?” I asked.  Worry in my voice and concern on my face.

“I’m sure. There are still things I want to do on the place, stuff I want to improve on, things that need my attention.” he replied with a huge smile.

morman-creasing-the-corn.jpg

“Only stuff I will do, not someone else.”

Planting-alfalfaI need to tear up the old alfalfa field and reseed a new field, take the dirt ditch and turn it into a cement ditch….fix fences so Hank’s cows can come again—if it’s rented out Hank has to take his cows someplace else.

Hubby

“I really can’t see myself sitting around.”

“But you won’t sit around, you have tons of projects you want to work on, not related to farming.”

kick-the-dirt

” I know.  I truly think I have dirt for blood.”

Sunset and combine 1So there you have it!  We begin again.  At least for one more year.  As long the body and mind can keep going.  We will keep farming on this farm created many years ago by Terry’s grandfather (purchased by us), until time demands stopping.

Changing-Water-at-Sunset-2Your friend  on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

The Start of the Pinto Bean Harvest, Thursday, September, 17, 2015

FloodRight after breakfast and the next set of irrigation water on the alfalfa field, Terry, Boomer, and I header over to hook-up the bean puller and bar.

bean-pullerThis is the bean puller

730-and-bean-pullerAnd hook up the bar on the back of the 730.  You understand that Terry does most the work.  Boomer is off somewhere checking out the news and I’m pretty much there to give him a tool, or the handyman jack, or move something out the way.  🙂

bean-bladeThat’s the blade…the puller pulls the beans out the ground and the blade cuts off any stems the puller misses.

ReadyThe pinto beans are ready.  The plant is dry, with only the weeds staying green and growing.

Harvest-2Up and down, careful, careful…you don’t want to run over the plants and loose your crop.

Harvest-1Slowly, ever so slowly,

RowsThe beans are put into rows.  Once the day warms up, Terry stops— warmer air will dry the dew off the pods causing the pods to split and spill the beans.

Tomorrow (if all goes well) he will put on a different blade and go out and lift all the rows UP so they are fluffy and can have air circulate among the plants.

Then we wait.  Terry says (if the warm weather holds and NO rain), in about a week the green weeds should be dry and he can start combining.

Harvest!  A huge process with nice results.

Your friend on a Western Colorado farm,

Linda

A Happy Dance — Thursday, August 27, 2015

12It’s raining here!

11Real rain!

10Terry is out changing the irrigation water…not me.  I’m sitting here, dry, and talking to you. 🙂

9I know…I’m a fair weather irrigator!  🙂

8

Actually, he has some things he wanted to do that I couldn’t help with, but still

7He is in the rain, with his yellow slicker on an rubber boots.

6And I’m not.

3The corn has dented…a full dent.  That means the last irrigation is soon.

2The pinto beans are starting to stripe and turn yellow…once fully yellow it will be time to let them dry so they can be harvested.

1We will irrigate the alfalfa field after the hay is cut and hauled in, then that will be it for the year.

More signs of fall…the ending of the growing season.

Your friend on a Western Colorado Farm,

Linda