Sounds Echo —- Monday, May 21, 2018

The sound of the tractor adds to the un-silence of the land.

Terry planted the pinto beans five days ago, and today he is Mormon Creasing the field.  By that he is taking taking the top off the row and smoothing out the top of the row so the little plants can work their way through a smaller amount of soil.

He also planted a new alfalfa field, which will make us two fields of alfalfa.  Although, the new field won’t be ready until next year.  There will be a possible cutting in September, but sometimes he doesn’t cut it; allowing the cows to graze it off instead.

This makes the whole farm in production. Finally.  Everything is some form of growth or another.

The irrigation water sparkles and splashing it’s way down each furrow cool and free.

Tomorrow or Wednesday (depending on the weather) it will be time to cut the alfalfa

next to our house.  Then the air will be scented with green alfalfa drying into lovely hay.

I will leave all the windows open in the house so the perfume fills our rooms and scents our sleep.

Busy times,

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

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In Need of a Wee Break—-Tuesday, April 10, 2018

In need of a wee break, Terry and I decided to head up to Ouray and relax for a couple of hours in that marvelous hot spring pool.

We changed the water in the dazzling rays of early morning

Then headed up to where the snow still veiled the mountains, and wind ruffled freezing fingers into your hair.

Once in the water all the cares and worries died to a murmur, while others in the pool laughed softly among themselves.

The snow laid heavily on the amazing peaks…sometime reflecting into millions of diamonds.  Once in awhile we could see rock climbers braving the face on the rugged cliffs, warmed by the afternoon sun.

Back home we came, just in time for sunset and the last change of water.

Rested…

And ready to continue our daily lives on a western Colorado farm,

Your friend,

Linda

What We Have Been Doing—-Tuesday, August 29, 2017

We have now reached a time when we are up WAY before the sun

“Stuff’ starts happening,

just as soon as the first set of water takes place, as the sun peaks over the horizon spreading sunshine like a veil on the night cooled land.

All loaded out hay goes out early before the sharp, brilliant heat bakes into the land

Then the work begins.

Terry and I work on

hanging steel for the walls

of the new building

Of course you do realize it’s mostly Terry that does most the work…although, he assures me he couldn’t get it done if I didn’t help 🙂

 Then when the heat is a silent, stabbing pain I work on painting the trim on the house

That way I can move around in the shade! 🙂 I still have the upstairs and the west side and half of the east side and I will be DONE!

Then as the coming dusk fills the sky and the earth (it’s coming earlier now)

 

It’s time for another set of water

The slice of Moon lighting the sky,

on the very last run to change water, around 10:00 p.m.

This is what we’ve been doing on these early fall days. 🙂

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

The Feeling of a Mountain—Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Today I am counting my blessings:

The first cutting of hay has been cut, dried, baled and stacked.

(And at the time of this writing, several loads of have been sold–loaded up and gone to new homes)

The biggest blessing is the fact Terry had to have an emergency appendix operation Sunday morning—shortly before noon, but is doing much better today.

Thankfully Saturday night we had turned the water back into the canal so I haven’t had to worry with changing and setting of the water.

Our children, near and far, came to see their Dad and to help us while Terry was in the hospital— it made the loading of the sold hay go ever so much easier, than if I had to do it by myself.

They have all gone home now, but the several days Terry was in the hospital I was there with him.  That left the kids to pick up our slack plus do their own work also.

What a huge relief!

In the midst of all this, I found another small heart!

It might be a mountain right now, but I know —————   somehow we will get the cultivation of the corn done and we will get the pinto beans planted.

I can do the irrigation…that isn’t even an concern.

The others things will sort themselves out as we proceed forward.

 

It will just take us (Terry and I) to take it one step at a time…that is really the only way to walk up, across and down and mountain.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

The Rhythm of Our Life—-Tuesday, April 18, 2017

The rhythm of our life

The Joy upon our faces and

the sunshine on the land

Morning, noon, and night.

This is the rhythm of our days
The rhythm of the land

The daily rhythm

Even in the way dark of the night

We spend it chasing water

 

This is the rhythm of our lives!

(Pretty bad, but I couldn’t get that song the Rhythm of the Night out of my head—tee hee)

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

The Last of Summer’s Hay—-Thursday, September 1 , 2016

Turning-the-haySunday we ‘did’ hay.

Because we had lots of rain and hail before we could get the hay up; Terry had to ‘turn’ the hay.  Sunday Morning he raked the hay turning it over so the top will be the bottom, and the bottom will be the top and the top will dry.

Baling-with-a-swallowThen about 1:00 in the afternoon the alfalfa had turned to hay. Off Terry went to bale.

Rolling-Bales-2

And Boomer and went out to roll bales and pick up broken bales (there were only two) and pick up all the loose hay on the corners

Rolling-Bales-1

Then we started hauling in the bales.

Stacking-Hay

(See the twisted bales?)

I did have a sort of a fright…not bad, but I was very much startled.  A huge bull snake was resting under one of the bales, when I moved the bale he jumped up and slithered off and I jumped up and out of his path!  🙂 🙂

We got half the field up and then finished on Monday; after we finished we worked some more on the firewood.

We are still irrigating, the alfalfa field will be the last field we set water on then we will be done for the year.  BUT FIRST…the field has to be marked out so the water can get down the rows.  Seems like there is always something.

Now-It's-Fall

It’s cold enough we must wear jackets in the early morning and late evening when we set water.  Sure seems early for jackets, but it is what it is.

Next will be pinto bean harvest—soon…very soon.

(Terry and I are getting a tad tired right now.)

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

The Adventures of Boomer on Friday—-Dad, Mom, Tally, and ME!

We have Tally here!  Tally and I hang out together and do FUN Tally and Boomer stuff!

All the time!

Helping-Grandpa-4

We also work.

Helping-Grandpa-3

We go with Dad and Mom and irrigate.

Helping-Grandpa-2

Mom and Dad change the water and Tally makes sure the water goes down the rows.

Helping-Grandpa1

I look for NEWS!

I LOVE news.

Helping-Grandpa-6

Tally is here until the weekend.  It’s her week with Dad, Mom and ME!

I LOVE having Tally here!

Boomer

When Time Stops—Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Evening-Gift-2On Sunday we left the Uncompahgre Plateau—25 Mesa to be exact—around three o’clock in the afternoon. Leaving behind the sun-warmed flowers, leaf mold, and coolness mountain air always seems to have.

Good-Morning-SunshineThe morning of Monday the sun broke free of the tree line; way after we got in from changing the water.  The air was full of wide awake birds, winging their way here and there.  Their flights crisscrossing the paths of other birds…no flight plan needed.

All-season-allAll, except for the pinto bean field,  the tractor work has ceased.  One more time a little later the pinto beans will be cultivated—knocking down the weeds so the beans can grow without interference.

Sun-over-the-PlateauWe work until the light slowly fades, retreating beyond the Uncompahgre Plateau.  The thick shadows, edge the the little knolls on our place, and rim the the ditch banks.  The fugitive light highlights the leaves on the corn causing green shadows, which shift in the evening breeze.

Shadows“This is my favorite time of the day,”  Terry tells me at least once a week.  “The air cools, a feeling of renewal takes place, everything starts to have a calm feeling.”

Morning-FlightFor me it is morning.

My favorite time of the day…for just a second, as the sky lightens, the hope of the new day rises in me, I feel energized and ready for whatever might come.”

SunriseIt is only for a moment.

Then the sun bursts froth and the day begins.  But for the moment it feels as if the freshness of the day will last forever.

Sunset-2

Either way—sunrise, or sunset…the feeling is there.  The moment when time stops.  I’m sure it is different for everyone.  That feeling of birth.

From my world to your heart,

Linda

Once Farming Begins—-Wednesday, June 8, 2016

CultivateNothing stops for very long. (Getting ready to cultivate)

OffThere is always something to do.  The work begins in that strange dawn light, called First Light.  That time when the light just starts to swell and become real.

Off-4

The work is solitary, but not lonely

Off-3There is always something (here he is going to knock down the dirt so the plants come push through)

Planting-PintosPlanting the last of our crops, the pinto beans.  The type we plant is Bill Zee.

Sitting-Water-on-the-dirt-d

And always, always there is the water to change…morning, noon and night….and sometimes at mid-night.

WaitingI do NO tractor work, but Boomer and I always help with the irrigation.

Wind

Wind, rain, sun, and in the shredding of the night, called Dawn

Ponder

or the slow leaving of the sun’ dominance of the day

Photo-of-Us

We are there.  Moving together as one.

From my world to your heart,

Linda

The Voice of the Wind—-Monday, April 25, 2016

Dams-1I can’t remember now, which day was so full of wind we had trouble setting the dams in the dirt ditch, maybe it was Thursday or Friday — when you don’t work for someone else each day tends to be the same as the day before and the day following.

More-DamsAnyway we had a big wind for along time.  It was cold at different points, warmer at other points.

Ditch-CompanyThe canals filled up with trash — enough that the ditch company had to come back through with their equipment to clean them out.

More-DCBoomer was deeply enchanted with having them come through

Stranger!The wind actually picked up his ears, for him, as he ran forward to ‘save the farm’  I was delighted at his cute ears flying in the wind!

Mid-night-water-checkWind of that magnitude (55 m.p.h. gusts) causes us to go out several times at night —keeping the canal in it’s banks, the irrigation water in the proper ditches and the furrows going straight.  Night-CheckAll without weeds and debris, to choke everything off and cause floods. Runs like this give us a sense of absolute security.

FlowingThen the wind leaves, pushing its way onto other parts of the country.  The setting sun lights up the water with jewels; the flat lands and canyons below our mesa shadowed in deep indigo and purple, the edges of the Uncompahgre rich in the color of rubies.

SetTerry and I share a deep contentment, of work well done, as we finish up in the company of the sky.

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda