A Newspaper Article by a Wonderful Friend—-Sunday, June 2, 2019

Terry is enlarging the  pasture

Working at it steady so the grass will grow big and strong and healthy before the heat of the summer arrives

The other four pastures are really looking rich and green…Terry says it really nice to have the time and the energy to work on some of the other parts of the farm.

Which brings me to this post I’ve wanted to do for a little spell.

Our cows back in the day

A long time blog friend writes for the local paper in her New York area, the Amsterdam Recorder, she took a wee trip and wrote about it for all her readers to enjoy.  I asked her if I could reprint a  bit of it for my farming blog and she said yes.

The grandchildren watching the cows being moved years and years ago

“And speaking of being, as opposed to seeing, green, we encountered evidence of recent hot “green” issues along the way. While waging our own battles on the leg of the trip south through Pennsylvania, dodging potholes with varied success, and heaping language not befitting ladies and gentlemen upon some of the drivers with whom we narrowly avoided close encounters of the crashing kind, I noticed something interesting.

While all of America frets and stews about flatulence from cattle, most of which live in the relatively clean, green, rural countryside, a little air freshening around urban backdoors might be in order.

As we wound down the mountains of the Keystone State, sometimes mistaking the potholes on 81 for valleys, the actual valleys were filled wall-to-wall with cities; houses, factories, malls and parking lots.

And every single one of them was shadowed under its own smoggy mantle of flatulence. The kind that emanates from cars and trucks and heating systems and all the things associated with large collections of people. I have never seen a miasma such as that over a barn, pasture or even the most crowded of feedlots.

Alas, because there aren’t many farmers left, the people who eat what they grow and who wear the products of those cotton fields, don’t understand them anymore. They blame them for something they are.”

Marianne Friers,

Northview Dairy

Amsterdam Recorder

Our cows out on the pasture on the Back Forty,

I know that each and every one of you, gentle readers, are not the people who condemn farmers or farming as a way of life, but huge supporters, for often times I get emails saying “Thank a Farmer”.

Our cows coming in for breakfast years and years ago

But for those who are new to my blog, or new to anyone’s blog about farming…I thought what Marianne wrote was well said.  Often times it’s the very thing we are condemning others for, which we are (also) guilty.

So too not preach or make anyone uncomfortable I leave you now.

From my humble heart to your world,

Linda

A Gift—-Thursday, June 2, 2016

“A true friend is someone who reaches for your hand and touches your heart.”—Unknown

Each one of you have touched my heart in some way, every day.  From heartfelt comments, to joyful celebrations on your blog or through your comments on my blog.

For that I thank each and every one of you!

From-LindaThis came in the mail today!  A glorious canvas photograph wall hanging. all the way from Canada.  (If you would like– hop on over to Linda’s blog.  She lives on a huge ranch in Alberta, Canada.  Just click on the blue lines and you will be taken there. 🙂  )

I am so humbled by all of you!

From my heart to your world,

Linda

 

Shimmering Heat—Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Evening-1Yesterday was HOT, so hot that my towels dried on the clothes line in half-an-hour, flapped and snapped with the afternoon wind.

Yellow-IrisIt made my laundry chores easy–wash, hang out, bring in, fold, and put away–load after load quickly ‘done’, no waiting about, finished!

Food The honey bees, the bumble bees and the hummingbirds all hummed and buzzed over the messy colorful flower beds as I washed windows and watered the flowers and the lawn.

It may have been hot, but it was peaceful.

rft.jpgThe evening was still extremely warm as we sat the water in the top field of corn, then skirting the alfalfa field we changed the set in the pinto bean field.

People think of night falling…falling down around the land, closing off the day.

nmjBut really night doesn’t fall, the shadows of the land rise, filling first the hollows and the valleys, climbing up the slopes of the mesas as the sun sinks lower and lower toward the west.  Gradually the shadows become darker creeping imperceptibly up fence posts and weeds.

The fields were so warm we could feel and smell the water as the earth and the plants sucked up the moisture.  It was a joy to irrigate since the irrigation water has also warmed, no longer feeling like a fresh melted snowbank.

gttrI stopped work to try and take a photo of the moon, which was gradually moving behind a pink cloud.  I turned to smile at Terry I told him there is a huge joy of trying to capture what we see on a daily basis and share it with you.

sgBy the time we were done, the sky had turned from pink to flaming gold.  The sun was somewhere over Utah and the ground, the farm, was started to join the greater dark of the star and moon lite night above.

My cup of joy runneth over! I wish for each of you, my friends, the same.

Love,

Linda

 

 

 

Sunday, June 2, 2013

We are getting closer and closer to the the first cutting of alfalfa…probably the end of this week of the first of next week.  We like to wait for the alfalfa to just start to bloom

About-readyYou can see the tiny purple dots on the stems right now…you can also see some dandelions.  This is the field that will be plowed up next year…it’s starting to get old.

A hay field is old when you can see dandelions and/or other weeds in it. We don’t spray for weeds we take the field and plant something else to give it a rest from the 3-5 years of alfalfa.  It’s called rotational farming, which we have always practiced.

Sun-Set-1

The sunset last night was on the weird side — really yellow.

As I was watching the sun set I saw a

Summer-SundogSun dog!

Actually that is really strange as we just got through with cold windy weather of the last four days and the weather people are saying we are heading into two weeks of extremely hot weather.

Usually if you see a sun dog it means frigid weather is about to hit……… humm.

Odd don’t you think?

The pinto beans are up

Better-Beans

 

We are planted as much as we are going to plant this year and the crops are all up. (We don’t need any type of freeze now…that is for sure!)

Rumors have it that soon, very soon, they will be around to cut us down two more holes on the head gate…I hope they don’t do it for a couple of weeks, maybe longer.  I’m sure that is just “hope” on my part.

Enjoy your Sunday everyone, today at 4 p.m. my oldest granddaughter is coming to ‘spend the night with us and part of tomorrow.  It should be lots of fun for her grandpa and myself!

Linda