We Bit the Bullet—-Wednesday, April 12, 2017

We had one last ditch on our place that was a dirt ditch.

Dirt ditches are a pain to work with…they fill up with mud, weeds and water plants, which go crazy happy in them; the water is soaked up in their little feet, the bank leaks making the farm road a mud mess, and the setting of the syphon tubes a huge job by the end of the summer. (A hole has to be dug in the mud to set each and every tube…Anyway, after much thought and deliberation we decided (at our ages) the cost of a new ditch made of cement would be the way to go.

.So we had the ditch grated in, surveyed and then opened up for the pour.

A huge great line of wonderful new ditch in the making

This is the ‘boat’ the cement will be poured into…

Here they are making the pour.

It took three loads of cement

By four o’clock yesterday afternoon—

It was done!  What a huge financial expense, but what a wonderful ditch we will have starting Friday!  (The cement has to cure first)

YAY!

Your friend on a western Colorado farm,

Linda

 

 

Advertisements

Where I Write—Wednesday, April 12, 2016

Celi from the Kitchens Garden issued a wee challenge to those over 5, 000 strong followers to do a post about—- Where You Write. Where-I-write-2As you can see my little office is upstairs with our spare bedrooms–one of the things I love to do is research for Genealogy so I have tons of material which I have collected on both sides of the desk.

Where-I-write1Besides two bedrooms there is a small sitting room—whereby I love looking out the window.

The grandchildren love this upstairs space…spending hours up here when they come.  The interesting thing about all that is it took YEARS for them to even want to come upstairs let along SLEEP up here–I don’t know what changed for them, but they love it up here now. (Sometimes too much…running and jumping on beds is NOT a good thing 😦 )

My little office is private, calm, and personal.  Allowing me a small bit of quiet to fuel my imagination. A place to get away from it all.

Love,

Linda

 

 

First Irrigation of the Year—Sunday, April 12, 2015

Water-1We started the water for the first time Thursday morning around 6:00.   Terry worked at the head gate and I cleaned the ditches as the water flowed toward the fields.  I rejoiced that I had gained back my summer muscles by the time we turned on the water! You see a person must straddle the ditch, pitch fork in hand and scoop and fling out trash like crazy, then jump back to one side and rush down to a further location, straddle the ditch, and start scooping again until we get to end of our place and the water flows back into the canal.

There is always, always tons of trash in the ditches.

SetThen Terry joins me, he places the dams along the cement ditch; backing up the water. After which we start the tubes, he digs out the furrows and I start the tubes.  We must work fast or the water will back up and flood over the sides creating a mini-disaster.

Corn-waterTwice a day every day the tubes are changed….every two hours or so, the tubes are checked to make sure there is no trash in the ditch and the water isn’t running over into fields that haven’t been worked.

Racing-WaterDuring the daytime–the morning set —we are watering the corn ground —Terry likes to water-up the seeds, instead of planting and then watering.

In the evening we move the water to the alfalfa field, since it doesn’t need to be checked while we sleep.

Spring time work is always a huge, huge push.  But there are so many wonderful things about being out there on the land:  the smell of the ground as the water hits it for the first time, the extremely cold invigorating wind on your face as you drive the  4-wheeler, the warm body of Boomer as he huddles next to me using me as a shield, the peace and beauty all around, seeing pheasants rise with loud squawks and cries of alarm, if we get too close to them, watching a fox trot along the edge of the alfalfa field searching for mice, bending over and setting a tube (and it works the first time) then moving on, always staying ahead and in a rhythm, the sun coming up and starting to warm the air the land and you, shedding your jacket and feeling the sudden coolness that soon disappears as you work.

Long before we finish the  last set of the day the air starts to cool down so the jackets come back on, Boomer is tired and hangs by me all muddy and pleased with himself, the Western Meadowlarks are now silent and the Red-winged black birds chirping sleepy time calls, a little family of Kill Deer run quickly away from us, and the sun breaks forth into dazzling colors, peace and calm settle down upon the land as the life giving water flows toward the end of the field.

Last-Set-1Your friend on a Western Colorado Farm,

Linda